emotions in business #blkcreatives Twitter chat

7 misconceptions to consider about emotions in business

Emotions in business get a bad rep.

They don’t necessarily need to be completely moved out of the equation, they just need to be nurtured and managed properly so you can do what you need to do. During our most recent #blkcreatives Twitter chat, we unpacked emotions in business.

The first question asked was, “What do you think is one (or some) of the biggest misconception(s) we can make about emotions and business?” Below are the responses for you to think through on your own time.

“The belief that you will always know the best move to make isn’t always true. The journey is through what you learn along the way. Good business is all about experience. Taking what didn’t work and reusing that knowledge gained to create what will. – Yusuf

 

“We really have to realize that emotions are not facts. And while I fully believe in ‘trusting your gut” it can be extremely dangerous to make big business decisions based on fleeting emotions. Ask me how I know.” – Alisha

 

“Unpopular opinion::: Emotions shouldn’t be involved in business. I think this is virtually impossible. It’s an attractive facade but not realistic. Business is usually not a sensitive place to emotions and these become distorted through a lack of empathy.” – Rosetta

 

“Thinking you can always have your way. The real “bag” is reserved for grown ups and people mature enough to handle the weight that comes with higher ticket business opportunities. Sometimes you’ll have to take W’s and L’s (lessons) to elevate in your career.” – Giselle

 

“Being kind/generous is seen as being emotional over logical. Managers excuse their cruelty as sound business decisions. But it’s not. Plenty of businesses thrive BECAUSE of their kindness and generosity. Being cruel is emotional and driven by a thirst for power, not logic.” – Taylor Goethe

 

“People care about your feelings and emotions in business. I believe sometimes as creatives we are very passionate and tethered to what we do. This can often become intertwined with business and many business ethics or approaches dismiss certain connectivity.” – Rosetta

 

“That business isn’t personal because it is. When you take the personal out of business, you forget to connect with prospects and customers. People want to feel like they’re a part of something and saying “business isn’t personal” takes that opportunity away.” – Evelynn